Name and Knowledge patches

New game means new art in the works! 🙂

Name

“Dragonslayer Adventures!” I cried.

“What’s with all the violence in RPGs?!” cried others.

“Oh…” said I.

I love slaying dragons. It’s in my name, given when I hatched to slay fire-breathing lizard-kind. Bard the Bowman is the cover image of the blog.

But, the violent nature of the name wasn’t something I considered until the survey for kid’s games came out. Then, as I continued making more worlds for the game, stripping IPs of their serial numbers, I realized that “Dragonslaying” is a little too specific for what the game can do.

On top of that, I’ve been stealing many of the terms, phrases, and verbiage from my own Adventure Hour! in 0.3 of development. So, uh, why just use that name?

My blog is the first to come up (at least I think) when you google “adventure hour rpg.” So that’s good.

I love the word “adventure” as so elegantly summarized by Ben Milton. “Adventure” makes me think The Hobbit, Ranger’s Apprentice, Artemis Fowl, Harry Potter, not just Dungeons and Dragons. That open nature will be especially handy for pitching new worlds to play in.

And “hour” speaks to the fast-paced nature of the games I prefer while also setting expectations about time. Either the game will last an hour or there will be breaks on the hour. Of course, the actual length varies depending on the group.

An hour is actually how long my Outschool games are anyway. 🙂

(It might also be fun to incorporate Tim B.’s Goblets and Grues timer mechanic. A game “based largely on Adventure Hour.” Back and forth the design process goes.)

Finally, the exclamation point. It’s a must, haha.

So “Dragonslayer Adventures” –> “Adventure Hour!”

Getting a full development. Working every day on it. It’s over 33 pages right now, making it already eight times larger than my previous published game Skorne.

Knowledge

I didn’t want to post today without giving some gaming advice, so here goes.

A while ago, I posted about “Knowledge and Perception” pointing out how those rolls can be so bad for the game. Here was that framework for knowledge.

When a player asks if their PC knows something, consider the following:

  • Is it common knowledge? If so, the PC knows it, unless there is a compelling reason why they shouldn’t.
  • Is it specialist knowledge? If so, the PC knows it if their background or past experiences cover it.
  • Is it esoteric knowledge? If so, the PC only knows it if their background or past experiences cover it and they succeed at a Fortune Roll. This roll may be modified by just how obscure the information is.

When I took this idea to the larger world, there was valid criticism of the Fortune Roll being included in there. And since going as diceless as possible for my games (but to decrease the focus on the rules and increase the impact of those rolls) I’ve realized that I want to remove this roll to AND expand the opportunities for adventure.

So, since incorporating this article into the developing Adventure Hour!, here’s the change:

Knowing

When a player asks if their character knows something, consider the following:

Is it common knowledge? They know it unless there is a compelling reason why they shouldn’t.

Is it specialist knowledge? They know it if their background or experiences cover it.

Is it esoteric knowledge? They will need to find an expert or resource in that subject area.

There. Fortune Roll eliminated. Find an expert or resource in that subject area. On to more adventures!

It’s a simple framework. I do like it. 🙂

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